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Country is divide into Trump supporters and protesters

The country is divided which is clearly shown earlier this month in the rally in Charlottesville. 

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U.S. President was scheduled to hold the rally in the campaign near the convention center on Tuesday before 4 PM. Two vendors were selling several products along with the interesting messages which seem like competing messages.

On the one side of the street, two people sold caps for $20 with “Make America Great Again” message and red-splattered electoral map printed T-shirts with “Better coverage than Verizon. Can you hear us now?” message.

There were several vendors hawked stickers, buttons and signs along with the message like: “Resist!,” “No border wall,” “Make racists afraid again,” “White silence is compliance,” “Punch your local Nazi” and “Goodnight alt-right.”

The event was on hold for another 3 hours but volunteers received donations for products with competing messages. The thousands of protesters and rallygoers who reached there to participate in the campaign rally cleared whom they support.

Many protesters took part in the discussions. The local police officers served as the buffer. The temperature was near 106 degrees, volunteers of both the sides handed out water bottles.

Rev. Michael Weldon prayed: Where there is hatred, let me sow love. Weldon said, “I hear anger in people’s voices.”

The rallygoers and protesters were standing on the other side of the street as well in the lines with recycling trucks and trash. A protester was holding a neon pink sign which reads, ‘Trump the Ignoramus.”

The man shouted, “He’s a chicken! Chicken!”

The 28-year-old Robyn Elam said to friend, “I don’t even know what he’s saying.” She said, “I can’t understand him at all.”

The country is divided which is clearly shown earlier this month in the rally in Charlottesville.

Elam works in the health-care industry and she lives in Tempe, Ariz., said, “Personally, I like the statues being up. To me, it’s not celebrating racism; it’s remembering the past.” She said, “If you try to erase history, how do you remember the past?”

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