Home World News Japanese media worker dies from “overwork” becomes national debate

Japanese media worker dies from “overwork” becomes national debate

The debate forced the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe to address a monthly overtime cap at 100 hours also penalties for companies to a workplace culture of overtime in Japan in order to prove the dedication.  

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A 31-year-old Japanese media worker has died from heart failure, she did 159 hours of overtime in just one month before her death.

Miwa Sado worked in public broadcaster, NHK in Japan. As per the several reports, she took only two days off in July 2013, at that time she worked around 2 times the hours considered for American standard — 40 hours work weeks which leads to 160 hours for a month.

Japanese media worker dies from "overwork" becomes national debate

 

The young lady, Sado’s death was attributed to a Japanese term for “death from overwork” — “Karoshi.”

Sado’s employer made her death public on this week. The recent case is supposed to higher the level of pressure on the work standard of the country that takes people’s lives in a huge number, the Guardian reported.

It is not the first kind of a case in the country, last year the 24-year-old Matsuri Takahashi ended up her life due to work-related stress, she had put more than 100 hours of overtime in a month. Matsuri Takahashi killed herself on Christmas Day, her death was also attributed as karoshi.

Takahashi was depressed and tired, in her early social media post, she wrote: “I want to die.” She posted on her social media account, “I’m physically and mentally shattered.”

Masahiko Yamauchi who is a senior official from NHK told the Guardian, Sado’s death reflected a “problem for our organization as a whole, including the labor system and how elections are covered.”

In a statement issued by NHK department, Sado’s parents said: “Even today, four years on, we cannot accept our daughter’s death as a reality. We hope that the sorrow of a bereaved family will not be wasted.”

Sado’s death has become a topic of national debate, where people are questioning about Japan’s work practices. The debate forced the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe to address a monthly overtime cap at 100 hours also penalties for companies to a workplace culture of overtime in Japan in order to prove the dedication.

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