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Breast cancer information removed from HHS website but why?

Before this, content related to health issues of the bisexual woman and lesbian was also get removed from HHS website.

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Breast cancer is a leading and influencing reason for death in women. The main reason behind this is the lack of knowledge which the women have about breast cancer. The update which comes forward tells that the data about breast cancer gets removed from Health and Human Service (HHS) website due to lack of use.

“While content about mammogram breast cancer screening remains, informational pages and fact sheets about the disease, including symptoms, treatment, risk factors, and public no- or low-cost cancer screening programs, have been entirely removed and are no longer found elsewhere on the OWH [Office of Women’s Health],” according to a Sunlight Foundation report.

Breast cancer information removed from HHS website but why?

An HHS spokesperson told, “The pages were removed on December 6, 2017, because the content was not mobile-friendly and very rarely used. Before we update any of the information … we engage in a comprehensive audit and use analysis process that includes reviewing other federal consumer health websites to ensure we are not duplicating efforts or presenting redundant information.”

Before this, content related to health issues of the bisexual woman and lesbian was also get removed from HHS website. Toly Rineberg from the Sunlight Foundation told, “we have not found comparable content accessible on the Office on Women’s Health site.”

The main page of this website was carrying information about breast cancer screenings, symptoms, diagnosis, prevention and several risk factors. “Breast cancer will be diagnosed in more than a quarter million U.S. women this year alone, and more than 154,000 people are living with metastatic — or incurable — breast cancer in the U.S. today,” a spokesperson for the Susan G. Komen Foundation wrote.

“It is absolutely critical that women, and men, have the most up-to-date evidence-based information available to them, about the disease itself and very important about the resources that may be available to them for free or low-cost screenings, treatment support, psychosocial support, local programs that may help them and financial support that they may need,” Susan G. Komen Foundation added.

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