Home Health It might be difficult to quit smoking for e-cigarette users

It might be difficult to quit smoking for e-cigarette users

The study tells that the e-cigarettes with nicotine can work as an addictive element for the users.

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There are many updates related to e-cigarettes which are found to cover some mix reactions about the bad and good effects of e-cigarettes. A recent update is about those who think that they can easily quit smoking by using e-cigarettes. The U.S. study tells that it will be easier to quit smoking without using e-cigarettes. The research done had involved 1,357 adult smokers who were facing a complicated situation and eagerly wants to quit this habit as well.

Patients are advised for some of the effective treatment patterns. The study updated that around 28 percent of participants used e-cigarettes within three months after getting discharged. After six months of the treatment, patients had left the hospital and around 10 percent of them found to use e-cigarettes for three months after discharge. Those who had used e-cigarettes for 3 months quit smoking faster than those who had not used e-cigarettes at all.

It might be difficult to quit smoking for e-cigarette users

The study doesn’t tell about the direct impact of e-cigarettes in relation to quitting smoking. Dr Nancy Rigotti who is a researcher at Harvard Medical School and director of the Tobacco Research and Treatment Center at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston says,”The study is consistent with the hypothesis that smokers need to use e-cigarettes regularly and daily and switch completely from cigarettes to e-cigarettes for them to have the greatest chance of help.”

The study tells that the e-cigarettes with nicotine can work as an addictive element for the users which becomes a barrier in their way to quit smoking. It is also updated that the products which are used in e-cigarettes as e-liquid can increase the risk of breathing problems. “These patients are at high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events (e.g., heart attacks, unstable angina, and mortality) if they continue to smoke,” said lead study author Sarah Windle of Jewish General Hospital in Montreal.

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