Home Health Salmonella Outbreak: 12 New Cases of Salmonella Infection

Salmonella Outbreak: 12 New Cases of Salmonella Infection

The CDC warns against the eating of recalled eggs and advising consumers, retailers, and restaurants to throw them away or return them to the place of purchase.

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12 more people suffer from the salmonella outbreak linked to recalled eggs produced by Rose Acre Farms’ Hyde County farm from five states, revealed the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, May 10.

Salmonella Outbreak: 12 New Cases of Salmonella Infection
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35 people infected with Salmonella Braenderup from nine states updated on April 16 and eleven people affected have been hospitalized.

The CDC warns against the eating of recalled eggs and advising consumers, retailers, and restaurants to throw them away or return them to the place of purchase.

The CDC said, “Check egg cartons for the following numbers: P-1065 (the plant number) and another set of numbers between 011 and 102 (the Julian date), or, for Publix and Sunups egg cartons, plant number P-1359D and Julian date 048A or 049A with Best By dates of APR 02 and APR 03.”

Eggs are the most nutritious food. The consumer should observe caution at the time of handling and prepare fresh eggs and egg products to avoid food poisoning. Eggs contain Salmonella which can cause illness when eggs are eaten raw or lightly cooked.

Eggs should be cooked at the time when the yolk and white are firm. The dishes of the egg should be cooked at a temperature of 160°F (71°C) or hotter.

The CDC advises the consumer to purchase and use pasteurized eggs and egg products which reduce odds of getting a Salmonella infection. Consumers should buy eggs from that supplier who keeps eggs refrigerated at 40°F (4°C) or colder. Those eggs which are dirty and cracked needs to be avoided. Eggs and egg dishes should be consumed promptly after cooking or placed in the fridge.

The CDC said, “Eggs that spend a significant amount of time in the nest can become dirty or break.” The CDC added, “Eggs with dirt and debris can be cleaned with fine sandpaper, a brush or cloth. Don’t wash eggs, because colder water can pull bacteria into the egg.”

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